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100 GENERATIONS OF SOIL – a solo exhibition of sculptures and mixed media drawings - remains installed at the Dylan Lewis Sculpture Garden in Stellenbosch throughout the Summer.

100 Generations of Soil opened originally at CIRCA in Cape Town in May 2017 – and this is where the idea for the collaboration was sparked. Olivier explains: “I had a remarkable encounter with Dylan Lewis after the opening of my exhibition at CIRCA Cape Town. He approached me with appreciation for my work, and offered to extend the exhibition to his sculpture garden. Dylan was drawn to the work, not necessarily in the way it resonated with his work, but as a fellow sculptor and craftsman, he found my sensitivity and execution of material quite appealing.”

Olivier’s exhibition is curated in the Garden’s pavilion structure located at the seven-hectare sculpture garden, where many of Dylan’s artworks are on permanent display. “It is a new opportunity to have my work in a different, almost contrary setting,” Olivier says. Against the backdrop of breathtaking mountain views with etheric garden tapestry, the pavilion sits hidden like a protected cave. It is this cave-like atmosphere that resonates well with the work… challenging architecturally, it is quite a space in its own right.

Located between two worlds, one wild and one tamed, Lewis’ Sculpture Garden borders the suburbs of Stellenbosch and a rugged mountain wilderness where leopard still roam. In this garden of private myth, Lewis explores the Jungian notion of ‘the wilderness within’. 100 Generation of Soil joins this conversation, exploring that which ‘goes deep in the recesses of pre-memory’ and ‘the commonality of the origin of humankind.’

As Ursula von Rydingsvard remarked, there is significance in one sculptor recognizing a fellow sculptor. Visitors to the Dylan Lewis Sculpture Garden this summer can reflect upon two distinctive creative languages, yet equally profound in the study and excavation of the human condition.


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